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PETER USTINOV LP SIGNED AUTOGRAPH BLACKBEARD'S GHOST 1967

Ustinov, Peter LP Signed Autograph BlackbeardS Ghost 1967
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Ustinov, Peter LP Signed Autograph Blackbeard'S Ghost 1967
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Ustinov, Peter LP Signed Autograph BlackbeardS Ghost 1967
THIS IS AN AUTHENTICALLY AUTOGRAPHED LP BY PETER USTINOV...

WALT DISNEY PRESENTS THE STORY OF BLACKBEARD'S GHOST-NARRATED BY PETER USTINOV-FROM THE WALT DISNEY MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK(DISNEYLAND DQ 1305)PHOTO COVER IS SIGNED BY PETER USTINOV-CONDITION OF THE VINYL IS WEAK VG, COVER AND AUTOGRAPH IS VG.

Following military service as a private soldier during World War II, during which he had made propaganda films, starting with One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1942), with actors such as David Niven whom he also served as batman, he began to branch out into writing. His first major success was with The Love of Four Colonels in 1951. He starred alongside Humphrey Bogart and Aldo Ray in We're No Angels (1955). His career as a dramatist continued alongside his acting career, his best-known play being Romanoff and Juliet (1956). His film roles include Roman emperor Nero in Quo Vadis? (1951), Captain Vere in Billy Budd (1962), Lentulus Batiatus in Spartacus (1960), an old man surviving a totalitarian future in Logan's Run (1976), and in a half dozen films as Hercule Poirot, a part he first played in Death on the Nile (1978). Ustinov voiced the well-known anthropomorphic lion Prince John of the 1973 Disney animated movie Robin Hood. He also worked on several films as writer and occasionally director, including The Way Ahead (1944), School for Secrets (1946), Hot Millions (1968) and Memed, My Hawk (1984).

He won Oscars for Best Supporting Actor for his roles in Spartacus (1960) and Topkapi (1964). He also won one Golden Globe award for Best Supporting Actor for the film Quo Vadis, according to IMDB.com (he famously set the Oscar and Globe statues up on his desk as if playing doubles tennis; the game was also a love of his life, as was ocean yachting). Furthermore, Ustinov was the winner of three Emmys, one Grammy, and was nominated for two Tony awards.

Between 1952 and 1955 Ustinov starred alongside Peter Jones in the much-loved BBC radio comedy In All Directions. The show featured Ustinov and Jones as themselves in a car in London perpetually searching for Copthorne Avenue. The comedy derived from the characters they met along the way, often also played by themselves. The show was unusual for the time as it was largely improvised rather than scripted. Ustinov and Jones improvised on to a tape which was then edited for broadcast by Frank Muir and Denis Norden who also sometimes took part. Possibly the favourite characters were Morris and Dudley Grosvenor, two rather stupid East End spivs whose sketches always ended with the phrase "Run for it Morry" (or Dudley as appropriate.) Sadly no recording is known to survive.[4]

During the 1960's, with the encouragement of Sir Georg Solti, Ustinov directed several operas including Puccini's Gianni Schicchi, Ravel's L'Heure Espagnole, Schonberg's Erwartung, and Mozart's Magic Flute. Further demonstrating his great talent and versatility in the theater, Ustinov later did set and costume production for Don Giovanni.

His autobiography, Dear Me (1977), was well received and saw him describe his life (ostensibly his childhood) whilst being interrogated by his own ego, with forays into philosophy, theater, fame, and self-realization. In concluding, Ustinov muses "We have gone through much together, Dear Me, and yet it suddenly occurs to me we don't know each other at all".