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ROBERT TAYLOR PHOTO SIGNED AUTOGRAPH BILLY THE KID WATERLOO BRIDGE BATAAN KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE

Taylor, Robert Photo Signed Autograph Billy The Kid Waterloo Bridge Bataan Knights Of The Round Table
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Taylor, Robert Photo Signed Autograph Billy The Kid Waterloo Bridge Bataan Knights Of The Round Table
Item# tarophsiaubi
Price: $99.99

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Taylor, Robert Photo Signed Autograph Billy The Kid Waterloo Bridge Bataan Knights Of The Round Table
THIS IS AN AUTHENTICALLY AUTOGRAPHED PHOTO BY ROBERT TAYLOR..

THIS IS A 9 INCH BY 11 INCH BLACK AND WHITE LITHOGRAPH SIGNED BY ROBERT TAYLOR MOUNTED ON PHOTOGRAPHY PAPER. CONDITION OF THE PHOTO AND AUTOGRAPH IS VERY GOOD.

Throughout the late 1930s, Taylor appeared in films of varying genres including the musicals Broadway Melody of 1936 and Broadway Melody of 1938, and the British comedy A Yank at Oxford with Vivien Leigh. In 1940, he reteamed with his A Yank at Oxford co-star Vivien Leigh in Mervyn LeRoy's drama Waterloo Bridge.

In 1941, Taylor began breaking away from his perfect leading man image and began appearing in darker roles. That year he portrayed Billy Bonney (better known as Billy the Kid) in Billy the Kid. The next year, he played the title role in the film noir Johnny Eager opposite Lana Turner. After playing a tough sergeant in Bataan in 1943, Taylor contributed to the war effort by becoming a flying instructor in Naval Air Corps. During this time, he also starred in instructional films and narrated the 1944 documentary The Fighting Lady.[4]

In 1950, Taylor landed the role of General Marcus Vinicius in Quo Vadis, opposite Deborah Kerr. The film was a hit, grossing USD$11 million.[6] The following year, he starred opposite Elizabeth Taylor in the film version of Walter Scott’s classic Ivanhoe, followed by 1953's Knights of the Round Table and The Adventures of Quentin Durward, all filmed in England.

By the mid-1950s, Taylor's career began to wane. He starred in a comedy western in 1955 co-starring Eleanor Parker called Many Rivers To Cross. In 1958, he formed his own production company, Robert Taylor Productions, and the following year, he starred in the ABC hit television series The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor (1959-1962).[3] Following the end of the series in 1962, Taylor continued to appear in films and television including A House Is Not a Home and two episodes of Hondo. In 1965, after filming Johnny Tiger in Florida, Taylor took over the role of narrator in the television series Death Valley Days, when Ronald Reagan left to pursue a career in politics.[8] Taylor would remain with the series until 1969 when he became too ill to continue working.