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Edward G. Robinson Early Photo Signed Autograph Movie Scene

Robinson, Edward G.  Early Photo Signed Autograph Movie Scene
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Robinson, Edward G. Early Photo Signed Autograph Movie Scene
Item# roedgeaphsia
Price: $149.00

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Robinson, Edward G.  Early Photo Signed Autograph Movie SceneRobinson, Edward G.  Early Photo Signed Autograph Movie SceneRobinson, Edward G.  Early Photo Signed Autograph Movie Scene
This item is an 8 1/2" X 10 1/2",black and white photo of actor Edward G. Robinson. The photo has been mounted on an 8 1/2" X 10 1/2" piece of construction paper. The photo features Edward G. Robinson in a scene from on of his early movies.Edward Goldenberg Robinson, Sr. (born Emanuel Goldenberg, December 12, 1893 January 26, 1973) was an American stage and film actor of Romanian origin.An acclaimed performance as the gangster Rico Bandello in Little Caesar (1931) led to him being typecast as a 'tough guy' for much of his early career in works such as Five Star Final (1931), Smart Money (1931; his only movie with James Cagney), Tiger Shark (1932), Kid Galahad (1937) with Bette Davis and Humphrey Bogart, and A Slight Case of Murder (1938). In the 1940s, after a good performance in Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet (1940), he expanded into edgy psychological dramas including Double Indemnity (1944), The Woman in the Window (1945) and Scarlet Street (1945); but he continued to portray gangsters such as Johnny Rocco in John Huston's classic Key Largo (1948), the last of five films he made with Humphrey Bogart.After DeMille brought Robinson back into movies, his most notable roles occurred in A Hole in the Head (1959) opposite Frank Sinatra and The Cincinnati Kid (1965), which showcased Robinson alongside Steve McQueen. Director Peter Bogdanovich was considered as a possible director for The Godfather in 1972, but turned it down, later remarking that he would have cast Robinson in the role ultimately played by Marlon Brando. Robinson indeed tried to talk his way into the part (which was how he had won the role of Little Caesar forty years earlier), but Francis Coppola decided on Brando instead, over the initial objections of the studio.The photo has been autographed on the front by Edward G. Robisnon with a fountain pen in blue.........BOTH PHOTO AND AUTOGRAPH ARE IN VERY GOOD CONDITION..................