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DICK GREGORY LP SIGNED AUTOGRAPH THE LIGHT SIDE THE DARK SIDE

Gregory, Dick LP Signed Autograph The Light Side The Dark Side
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Gregory, Dick LP Signed Autograph The Light Side The Dark Side
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Gregory, Dick LP Signed Autograph The Light Side The Dark SideGregory, Dick LP Signed Autograph The Light Side The Dark Side
THIS IS AN AUTHENTICALLY AUTOGRAPHED LP BY DICK GREGORY..

DICK GREGORY(POPPY PYS 60 001)THE LIGHT SIDE THE DARK SIDE. LP IS TWO RECORD SET WITH GATEFOLD COVER. PHOTO COVER IS SIGNED BY DICK GREGORY. CONDITION OF THE VINYL,COVER, AND AUTOGRAPH IS VERY GOOD.

Richard "Dick" Claxton Gregory (born October 12, 1932) is an American comedian, social activist, writer and entrepreneur.

Born in St. Louis, Missouri, United States, Dick Gregory is an influential African American comic who has used his performance skills to convey to both white and black audiences his political message on civil rights. Influenced to stand up for civil rights by his early surroundings of poverty and violence, Gregory became the first comedian to successfully perform for both black and white audiences.

After completing military service, he performed as a comedian in small, primarily black nightclubs while working for the United States Postal Service during the daytime. In 1961, while working at the Black-owned Roberts Show Bar in Chicago, he was hired by Hugh Hefner to work at the Chicago Playboy Club after Hefner heard him wow a largely-white audience with the following routine:

Good evening ladies and gentlemen. I understand there are a good many Southerners in the room tonight. I know the South very well. I spent twenty years there one night.

Last time I was down South I walked into this restaurant and this white waitress came up to me and said, "We don't serve colored people here." I said, "That's all right. I don't eat colored people. Bring me a whole fried chicken."

Then these three white boys came up to me and said, "Boy, we're givin' you fair warnin'. Anything you do to that chicken, we're gonna do to you." So I put down my knife and fork, I picked up that chicken and I kissed it. Then I said, "Line up, boys!" [1]

Active in the civil rights movement, he came to Selma, Alabama and spoke for two hours on a public platform two days before the voter registration drive known as "Freedom Day" (October 7, 1963) (Howard Zinn, You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train,