Home > Actors > Fisher, Eddie Photo Signed Autograph Bundle Of Joy

EDDIE FISHER PHOTO SIGNED AUTOGRAPH BUNDLE OF JOY

Fisher, Eddie Photo Signed Autograph Bundle Of Joy
Enlarge Images
Fisher, Eddie Photo Signed Autograph Bundle Of Joy
Item# fiedphsiaubu
Price: $99.99

Product Description


Fisher, Eddie Photo Signed Autograph Bundle Of Joy
THIS IS AN AUTHENTICALLY AUTOGRAPHED PHOTO BY EDDIE FISHER...

THIS IS A 4 INCH BY 5 INCH BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO SIGNED BY EDDIE FISHER. CONDITION OF THE PHOTO AND AUTOGRAPH IS VERY GOOD.

By 1946, Fisher was crooning with the bands of Buddy Morrow and Charlie Ventura. He was heard in 1949 by Eddie Cantor at Grossinger's Resort in the Borscht Belt. After performing on Cantor's radio show he was an instant hit and gained nationwide exposure. He then signed with RCA Victor.

Fisher was drafted into the U.S. Army in 1951, sent to Texas for basic training, and served a year in Korea. From 1952 to 1953, he was the official vocal soloist for The United States Army Band (Pershing's Own) and a tenor section member in the United States Army Band Chorus (an element of Pershing's Own) in Washington, D.C. The photos of him in uniform during his time in the service did not hurt his civilian career. After his discharge, he became even more popular singing in top nightclubs. He also had a variety television series, Coke Time with Eddie Fisher (NBC) (1953 - 1957), appeared on Perry Como's show, The Chesterfield Supper Club and the George Gobel Show, and starred in another series, The Eddie Fisher Show (NBC) (1957 - 1959).

A pre-Rock and Roll vocalist, Fisher's strong and melodious tenor made him a teen idol and one of the most popular singers of the 1950s. He had seventeen songs in the Top 10 on the music charts between 1950 and 1956 and thirty-five in the Top 40.

In 1956, Fisher costarred with then-wife Debbie Reynolds in the musical comedy Bundle of Joy. He played a serious role in the 1960 drama BUtterfield 8 with then-wife Elizabeth Taylor. His best friend was showman and producer Mike Todd, who died in a plane crash in 1958. Fisher's affair and subsequent marriage to Todd's famous widow caused a show business scandal because he and his first wife, also famous, had a very public divorce.

In 1960, he was dropped by RCA Victor and briefly recorded on his own label, Ramrod Records. He later recorded for Dot Records. During this time, he had the first commercial recording of "Sunrise, Sunset" from Fiddler on the Roof. This technically counts as the biggest standard Fisher can claim credit for introducing, although it is rarely associated with him. He also recorded the album Eddie Fisher today which showed that he had more depth than his singles from the early years had shown. The Dot years were not successful in record sales terms but they did show him as a more competent and entertaining singer than the RCA Victor years. He then returned to RCA Victor and had a minor single hit in 1966 with the song Games That Lovers Play, which became the title of his best selling album. During the time Fisher was the most popular singer in America[citation needed], in the mid 1950s, singles, rather than albums, were the primary recording medium. His last album for RCA was an Al Jolson tribute, You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet. Eddie Fisher's last album was recorded around 1984 under the Bainbridge record label. Fisher tried to stop the album from being released but it showed up on the record stores shelves entitled After All. The album was produced by William J. O'Malley and arranged by Angelo DiPippo.

Fisher has performed in top concert halls all over the United States and headlined in major Las Vegas showrooms. He has headlined at the Palace Theater in New York City as well as London's Palladium.

Fisher has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, one for Recording, at 6241 Hollywood Boulevard, and one for TV, at 1724 Vine Street.