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JAMES COBURN PHOTO SIGNED AUTOGRAPH THE GREAT ESCAPE MAVERICK

Coburn, James Photo Signed Autograph The Great Escape Maverick
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Coburn, James Photo Signed Autograph The Great Escape Maverick
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Coburn, James Photo Signed Autograph The Great Escape Maverick
THIS IS AN AUTHENTICALLY AUTOGRAPHED PHOTO BY JAMES COBURN..

THIS IS AN EIGHT INCH BY TEN INCH BLACK AND WHITE PUBLICITY PHOTO SIGNED BY JAMES COBURN. CONDITION OF THE PHOTO AND AUTOGRAPH IS EXCELLENT.

After dozens of television roles, Coburn came to widespread attention in the 1960s and 1970s from a variety of films, first primarily with his friends Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn and Charles Bronson in the cinema classics The Magnificent Seven and The Great Escape. A villainous Texan in the hugely successful Charade (1963), a glib Naval officer in The Americanization of Emily (1964) and a character role as a one-armed Indian tracker in Major Dundee (1965) gained him much notice.

In 1966, he became a bona-fide movie star with the release of Our Man Flint, a James Bond spoof released by 20th Century Fox. After a sequel, he decided to branch off into the independent film world. Due to his interests in martial arts (which he discovered by training with Bruce Lee), Buddhism, and gong-playing, the remainder of the decade (which included less-than-memorable films) proved relatively uneventful in his career.

In 1971, he starred in the western A Fistful of Dynamite, a.k.a. "Duck, You Sucker," directed by Sergio Leone, as an Irish explosives expert and revolutionary who has fled to Mexico during the time of the Mexican Revolution in the early 20th Century.

He teamed up with director Sam Peckinpah for the 1973 film Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid (they had worked together in 1965 on Major Dundee). An MGM producer tried to sabotage the production, causing the film to be drastically edited when it opened. Peckinpah and Coburn were greatly disappointed and turned next to Cross of Iron, a critically acclaimed war epic which performed poorly in the U.S. but was a huge hit in Europe. The two remained good friends until the legendary director's death in 1984.

Due to severe rheumatoid arthritis, he was featured in very few films during the 1980s. He spent much of his time writing songs with British singer-songwriter Lynsey De Paul. He claimed to have healed himself with pills containing a sulfur-containing compound and returned to the screen in the 1990s, appearing in films such as Young Guns II (1990), Sister Act 2 (1993), Maverick (1994), The Nutty Professor (1996), and Payback (1999), mostly in minor but memorable roles. For his vivid portrayal of the abusive father of Nick Nolte in Affliction, he won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in 1998.