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SYDNEY CHAPLIN HOWARD DA SILVA PLAYBILL SIGNED AUTOGRAPH IN THE COUNTING HOUSE 1962

Chaplin, Sydney Howard Da Silva Playbill Signed Autograph In The Counting House 1962
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Chaplin, Sydney Howard Da Silva Playbill Signed Autograph In The Counting House 1962
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Chaplin, Sydney Howard Da Silva Playbill Signed Autograph In The Counting House 1962Chaplin, Sydney Howard Da Silva Playbill Signed Autograph In The Counting House 1962Chaplin, Sydney Howard Da Silva Playbill Signed Autograph In The Counting House 1962
THIS IS AN AUTHENTICALLY AUTOGRAPHED PLAYBILL BY HOWARD DA SILVA AND SYDNEY CHAPLIN..

THIS IS A 5 1/2 INCH BY 9 INCH PLAYBILL FROM THE BILTMORE THEATRE-1962-IN THE COUNTING HOUSE-PHOTO COVER IS SIGNED BY HOWARD DA SILVA AND SYDNEY CHAPLIN-CONDITION OF THE PLAYBILL AND AUTOGRAPHS IS VERY GOOD.

Sydney Earl Chaplin (March 31, 1926 March 3, 2009) was an award winning film and theatre actor. The third son of Sir Charles Chaplin and the second by his second wife, actress Lita Grey, Sydney Chaplin was named after his half-uncle Sydney Chaplin (18851965).

Lita Grey was 16 when she married the 35-year-old Charles Chaplin in 1924. Sydney was born two years later in Beverly Hills. His parents divorced a year later. Their elder son, Charles Chaplin Jr, died in 1968.

After serving in World War II, including a stint in Europe, Sydney turned to acting.

He won the 1957 Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical for Bells Are Ringing, opposite Judy Holliday, and received a Tony nomination for his performance as Nicky Arnstein, the gambling first husband of Fanny Brice, opposite Barbra Streisand, in the Broadway musical Funny Girl in 1964.

Never one to shrink from getting personally involved with his leading ladies, he had a relationship with Holliday during the "Bells Are Ringing" run; when it ended, she refused to talk to him or about him and ceased contact with any of his friends. During the run of "Funny Girl", Barbra Streisand, then newly married to Elliott Gould, would have trysts with him in their dressing rooms until she decided to end it; at that time he started disorienting her on stage by whispering "nose" to her during their "You Are Woman" love scene. She asked him to stop, he didn't; she then filed harassment charges against him with Actors' Equity.

Sydney appeared in two of his father's films, Limelight (1952) and A Countess from Hong Kong (1967).

Da Silva appeared in a number of Broadway musicals, including the role of "Larry Foreman" in the legendary first production of Marc Blitzstein's musical, The Cradle Will Rock (1937). Later, he costarred in the original 1943 stage production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma!, playing the role of the psychopathic "Jud Fry".He was the easy going Ben who controlled Tammany Hall in the Pulitzer winning musical Fiorello . In 1969 he originated the role of Benjamin Franklin in the musical 1776 and played him in the 1972 film version as well.

Da Silva appeared in over 60 motion pictures, some of his memorable roles include playing Ray Milland's bartender in The Lost Weekend (1945) and the half-blind criminal "Chicamaw 'One-Eye' Mobley" in They Live by Night (1949). He also released an album on Monitor Records of political songs and ballads, entitled, Politics and Poker.

In the 1950s, after being blacklisted as a result of the investigations into alleged communist influence in the movie industry by the House Committee on Un-American Activities and unable to find movie or TV work, Da Silva returned to the stage. He was nominated for the 1960 Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical for his role as "Ben Marino" in Fiorello! (1959).

Da Silva was nominated for the British BAFTA Film Award for Best Foreign Actor for his performance as "Dr. Swinford" in David and Lisa (1962). He was the narrator for the U.S. released versions of the British TV program Doctor Who. Da Silva portrayed Soviet Premier Khrushchev in the 1974 television docudrama "The Missiles of October." He won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Special for his role as Eddie in Verna: U.S.O. Girl (1978) with Sissy Spacek.

Da Silva's TV guest appearances, after the era in which blacklisting was strongest, include such programs as The Outer Limits, Ben Casey, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Fugitive, Gentle Ben, Mannix, Love, American Style, Kung Fu, and Archie Bunker's Place.

Da Silva also played Meyer Wolfsheim in The Great Gatsby (1974), Franklin D. Roosevelt in The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover (1983), Louis B. Mayer in Mommie Dearest (1981), "Angelo Dokakis" in Garbo Talks (1984), and Benjamin Franklin in 1776 (1972), as well as a documentary depicting the life of Ben Franklin shown at Benjamin Franklin's house in Philadelphia.

Da Silva also appeared as a voice actor in 26 episodes of an 1970s old-time radio revival show called The CBS Radio Mystery Theater between July 1974 and February 1977.[1]

Howard Da Silva died of lymphoma at the age of 76 in Ossining, New York.